Trees of Florida Glossary of Terms
 
 

a/b/c/d/e/f/g/h/i/j/k/l/m/n/o/p/q/r/s/t/u/v/w/x/y/z
 

Back to Trees of Florida Menu / Use "Back" to return to tree description
 
 

achene: a dry, one-celled, one-seeded fruit, the product of a simple pistol.

alternate: when a single leaf occurs at a node

apex: the portion of the leaf furthest from the petiole

arborescent: having the size and form of a tree

aril: a single seed surrounded by a thin or fleshy layer

base: portion of a leaf nearest the petiole

berry: a fleshy, several-seeded fruit with fleshy inner and outer walls

bipinnately compound: when the leaflets of a compound leaf are compounded or branched a second time

blade: expanded portion of a leaf.

buds: contain the growing points of stems

capsule: a dry fruit which is the product of a compound pistol

chambered pith: empty chambers separated by thin or thick partitions.

compound leaves: leaves with 2 or more blades

cone: a fruit composed of two or more woody, leathery, papery, or fleshy seed-bearing scales inserted on a central stalk

deciduous: losing leaves once a year.

diaphragmed pith: when denser, disc-like tissues bridge an otherwise homogeneous pith at regular intervals

dioecious: each sex of unisexual flowers occur on separate individuals

drupe: a fleshy, usually one-seeded fruit, with a sometimes hard inner wall

even-pinnately compound: compound leaves with an even number of leaflets

fascicle: a cluster or bundle of needle-like leaves

fluted: regularly marked by alternating ridges and groove-like depressions

follicle: a dry fruit which is the product of a simple pistol (the fruit of the southern magnolia is an example)

fruit: the seed-bearing organ of a plant

genus: the first or generic part of the scientific name of a plant

glabrous: smooth

habit: the habit of a tree is the tree's general appearance, it is useful in leading to specific tree identification

homogeneous pith: a pith of uniform texture

inflorescence: a characteristic flower cluster

leaflets: blades of a compound leaf

legume: a dry fruit which is the product of a simple pistol (a bean is an example)

lenticels: small dots, slits, or diamond-like or wart-like patches with aeration purposes

margin: the outside edge of a leaf blade

monoecious: when both sexes of unisexual flowers occur on the same individual

node: the point of leaf attachment on the twig

nut: a dry fruit, usually one-seeded with a bony, leathery, or papery wall

odd-pinnately compound: compound leaves with an odd number of leaflets

opposite: when a pair of leaves occur at a node, one on either side of the twig

palmately compound: compound leaves characterized by several leaflets radiating from a common point at the end of a rachis

perfect flower: presence of both male and female sex organs in the same flower

persistent: evergreen, does not lose leaves once a year.

petiole: supporting stalk of a leaf

pinnately compound: when the leaflets are dispersed laterally along the rachis of a compound leaf

pinnules: the blades of the second branching of a bipinnately compound leaf

pith: a mass of soft tissue in the central portion of a twig

polygamous: both perfect and unisexual flowers occur on the same individual

pome: a fleshy, succulent fruit, encompassing numerous seeds

pubescent: having small, fine hairs

rachis: the stalk to which the blades of a compound leaf are attached

samara: a winged achene

sessile leaves: leaves lacking a petiole, attached to the twig at the base of the leaf

simple leaves: leaves having a single blade attached to the twig by a petiole

species: the second or specific part of the scientific name of a plant

spongy pith: when the pith is exceedingly porous

stipules: small scalelike or leafy structures attached to the twig at either side of a petiole or rachis

subopposite: when leaves are nearly but not quite opposite

trifoliate: compound leaves with three leaflets

tripinnately compound: when pinnules of a compound leaf are compounded or further branched

unisexual flower: if either sex organ is not functional or is not present

whorled: when three or more leaves appear at a common node
 
 

Back to Trees of Florida Menu / Use "Back" to return to tree description